Literacy Narrative:about the impact of reading upon your life

  

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ENG 1102: Essay 1: Literacy Narrative
Assignment: Write a short essay about the impact of reading upon your life. A literacy essay explores one’s
growth as a reader. Don’t confuse “literacy” with “literature.” The goal is to come up with a thesis that states
how one specific text, or perhaps a series of them, or just the written word in general contributed to your
personal development.
What you’ll be graded upon:
15%
Introduction: You set a context for why it’s important to discuss the place of reading and writing in our
lives. How has your experience in these areas shaped your values? What can other people learn from the
story you have to tell? You may use a specific anecdote or episode from your life to illustrate your point.
15%
Thesis: You state in 1-2 sentences your main idea. The thesis is the culmination of your introduction.
30%
Organization. You have two options for organizing your essay, depending on the focus you take:
OPTION 1: If you are writing about your experience becoming literate (learning to read and write), you
will probably take a narrative approach, detailing your first experiences in school or your first memories
of books or the first time reading or writing seemed to make a big impact on your life. You will want
strong transition from paragraph to paragraph, and your paragraphs should be around six sentences in
length to be fully developed. Your organization will probably be chronological, moving from stage to
stage in your life.
OPTION 2: If you focus more on a specific text or a specific reading experience, you’ll structure your
essay in a more subject-by-subject fashion. Your introduction will establish that you are writing about
significant moments at which literacy or particular texts impacted your life and give a sense of why
those moments or texts are important. Your body paragraphs will be organized around each of those
texts or moments, explaining what they were and narrating why they mattered. You will still want strong
transitions and paragraphs of roughly six sentences.
10%
Conclusion: Regardless of which option you choose, you want a conclusion that avoids summarizing
what you’ve just said. You also don’t want to say, “In conclusion.…” Your aim in a conclusion is to
place the discussion in a larger context. For example, how might those experiences be similar to or
different from those of other individuals? How do you envision the role of reading in your life in the
future?
15%
Grammar and mechanics: Your paper avoids basic grammar mistakes, such as dropped apostrophes in
possessives, subject/verb disagreement, arbitrary tense switches, etc. The paper demonstrates a
commitment to proofreading by avoiding easy-to-catch typos and word mistakes (effect for affect, for
example).
15%
Presentation: Your paper meets the minimum length criteria of 750 words, is typed with a title and your
name on it. You follow your individual professor’s instructions for formatting (margins, placement of
the name, etc).
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
An annotated bibliography is a list of secondary source citations with a short overview of each essay’s main
argument. The educational goal is to 1) gather information necessary for your final research paper and 2) to
train yourself in finding other authors’ theses sentences so you can write your own.
For this assignment you should:
1. List at least six secondary sources in alphabetical order. These should include 3 books and 3 journal articles.
2. Include all information required by the MLA style for the citation. You can find this in your handbook.
3. Include a 75-100 word summary of each source, which should include direct quotes. The goal here is for you
to find the author’s thesis sentence. Please note: Your annotated bibliography entries will be much longer than
the examples offered below.
4. Be proofread for grammar errors. For style guidance, go to https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/
Your bibliography should look something like this (only with longer entries):
An Annotated Bibliography of Works about Edna St. Vincent Millay, 1974-1993
With Supplement (1912-1973)
Adler, Amy. Rev. of Edna St. Vincent Millay: Poet, by Carolyn Daffron. School Library Journal 36 (Mar.
1990): 243.
While few students are familiar with M’s poems, “even fewer understand [their] impact on the political and
social structure of her time.” Daffron’s book will be welcomed by students once they are introduced to it.
Agosta, Lucien L. “Millay, Edna St. Vincent.” Notable Women in the American Theatre. Ed. Alice M.
Robinson, Vera Mowry Roberts, and Milly S. Barranger. New York: Greenwood, 1989. 640-44.
Lists M’s contributions to American theater. She “attended at the birth of serious American drama and helped to
create an atmosphere in which it could flourish.”
Alkalay-Gut, Karen. “Poetry by Women in America: Esthetics in Evolution.” Canadian Review of American
Studies 14 (1983): 239-56.
M is named as being among “the first burst of women poets who wrote as women, from the point of view of
women, with the concerns of women.” She is among those who had “something to say about being female.”
Finds that M engages in “hiding” and in “protecting the self,” often using a male persona and identifying with a
male perspective.
Allen, Gilbert. “Millay and Modernism.” Critical Essays on Edna St. Vincent Millay. Ed. William B. Thesing.
Boston: Hall, 1993. 266-72.
Original to this volume. Discussion of Popular Modernism and High Modernism and M’s place in the
movements. She scorned High Modernism and tried to satisfy “both her traditional sense of eloquence and the
demands of her many subjects.” While M’s reputation declined, the “overall quality” of her work did not. Her
“stylistic uncertainty” and her social consciousness poems place her outside the High Modernism movement.
Her place in 20th century poetry is not yet defined.
American Theatre Companies, 1888-1930. Ed. Weldon B. Durham. New York: Greenwood, 1987.
Brief mention of M as an important writer whose plays were produced by the Provincetown Players.
Anderson, Maxwell. “Second April.” Critical Essays on Edna St. Vincent Millay. Thesing. 37-38.
Reprinted from The Measure No. 7 (Sept. 1921): 17. Review of Second April.
The major flaw is the frequent use of insignificant or fantastic themes. The virtues include “an almost flawless
sensitiveness to phrase,” definiteness of object, and accurate, homely imagery. The sonnets show that M has
matured personally since RN.
August, Bonnie Tymorski. “The Poetic Use of Womanhod in Five Modern American Poets: Moore, Millay,
Rukeyser, Levertov, and Plath.” Diss. New York U, 1978. DAI-A 39/06 (1978): 3576.
Essay #1: Literacy Narrative
Write a short literacy narrative about yourself. Literacy narratives can often have
slightly different focuses, so you have a small amount of room for creativity, but they
primarily deal with detailing a person’s path to reading and writing (education and
experiences as a reader) and/or the impact that reading and writing has on their
lives. Keep in mind that the focus here is on “literacy” (the act of reading and/or
writing) and not as much on “literature” (which we’ll be talking about in class). Your
literacy narrative can involve your experiences with various “great” books, but it will
more likely encompass your experiences with a variety of texts, from internet reading, to
newspapers, to comic books, to whatever you tend to read or even write in your spare
time.
The organization of your paper will depend on the focus you want the essay to take. If
you are writing about your experience becoming literate (learning to read and write),
you will probably take a narrative approach, detailing your first experiences in school or
your first memories of books or the first time reading or writing seemed to make a big
impact on your life. In writing from this perspective, you will want a clear introduction
that establishes the story you plan on telling, strong transitions and paragraphs
(probably chronologically organized) that put that overall story together, and a
conclusion that goes beyond simple summary to address the large context of
what you’vejust written about. What ultimate impact did those early experiences have
on the reader/writer you are today?
If you focus more on particular texts or experiences of reading and writing and how
they have impacted your life, you would structure your essay in a more subject-bysubject fashion. Your introduction would establish that you are writing about significant
moments where literacy or particular texts impacted your life and give a sense of why
those moments or texts are important. Your body paragraphs would be organized
around each of those texts or moments, explaining what they were and narrating why
they mattered. In this structure, your conclusion would again go beyond simple
summary to put the discussion in a larger context. Have those particular moments or
texts changed the way you read or address writing now? How might those experiences
be similar to or different from those of other individuals?
Regardless of how you organize the paper, the final draft of your paper needs to be
typed, double spaced, and in 12 point font with one inch margins. Your name, the
instructor’s name, the course number, and date need to be in the upper left hand
corner of the first page. Your last name and the page number should appear in the
upper right hand corner of each page. In other words the full MLA format.
ENG 1102: Essay 1: Literacy Narrative
Assignment: Write a short essay about the impact of reading upon your life. A literacy essay explores one’s
growth as a reader. Don’t confuse “literacy” with “literature.” The goal is to come up with a thesis that states
how one specific text, or perhaps a series of them, or just the written word in general contributed to your
personal development.
What you’ll be graded upon:
15%
Introduction: You set a context for why it’s important to discuss the place of reading and writing in our
lives. How has your experience in these areas shaped your values? What can other people learn from the
story you have to tell? You may use a specific anecdote or episode from your life to illustrate your point.
15%
Thesis: You state in 1-2 sentences your main idea. The thesis is the culmination of your introduction.
30%
Organization. You have two options for organizing your essay, depending on the focus you take:
OPTION 1: If you are writing about your experience becoming literate (learning to read and write), you
will probably take a narrative approach, detailing your first experiences in school or your first memories
of books or the first time reading or writing seemed to make a big impact on your life. You will want
strong transition from paragraph to paragraph, and your paragraphs should be around six sentences in
length to be fully developed. Your organization will probably be chronological, moving from stage to
stage in your life.
OPTION 2: If you focus more on a specific text or a specific reading experience, you’ll structure your
essay in a more subject-by-subject fashion. Your introduction will establish that you are writing about
significant moments at which literacy or particular texts impacted your life and give a sense of why
those moments or texts are important. Your body paragraphs will be organized around each of those
texts or moments, explaining what they were and narrating why they mattered. You will still want strong
transitions and paragraphs of roughly six sentences.
10%
Conclusion: Regardless of which option you choose, you want a conclusion that avoids summarizing
what you’ve just said. You also don’t want to say, “In conclusion.…” Your aim in a conclusion is to
place the discussion in a larger context. For example, how might those experiences be similar to or
different from those of other individuals? How do you envision the role of reading in your life in the
future?
15%
Grammar and mechanics: Your paper avoids basic grammar mistakes, such as dropped apostrophes in
possessives, subject/verb disagreement, arbitrary tense switches, etc. The paper demonstrates a
commitment to proofreading by avoiding easy-to-catch typos and word mistakes (effect for affect, for
example).
15%
Presentation: Your paper meets the minimum length criteria of 750 words, is typed with a title and your
name on it. You follow your individual professor’s instructions for formatting (margins, placement of
the name, etc).
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
An annotated bibliography is a list of secondary source citations with a short overview of each essay’s main
argument. The educational goal is to 1) gather information necessary for your final research paper and 2) to
train yourself in finding other authors’ theses sentences so you can write your own.
For this assignment you should:
1. List at least six secondary sources in alphabetical order. These should include 3 books and 3 journal articles.
2. Include all information required by the MLA style for the citation. You can find this in your handbook.
3. Include a 75-100 word summary of each source, which should include direct quotes. The goal here is for you
to find the author’s thesis sentence. Please note: Your annotated bibliography entries will be much longer than
the examples offered below.
4. Be proofread for grammar errors. For style guidance, go to https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/
Your bibliography should look something like this (only with longer entries)
Essay #1: Literacy Narrative
Write a short literacy narrative about yourself. Literacy narratives can often have
slightly different focuses, so you have a small amount of room for creativity, but they
primarily deal with detailing a person’s path to reading and writing (education and
experiences as a reader) and/or the impact that reading and writing has on their
lives. Keep in mind that the focus here is on “literacy” (the act of reading and/or
writing) and not as much on “literature” (which we’ll be talking about in class). Your
literacy narrative can involve your experiences with various “great” books, but it will
more likely encompass your experiences with a variety of texts, from internet reading, to
newspapers, to comic books, to whatever you tend to read or even write in your spare
time.
The organization of your paper will depend on the focus you want the essay to take. If
you are writing about your experience becoming literate (learning to read and write),
you will probably take a narrative approach, detailing your first experiences in school or
your first memories of books or the first time reading or writing seemed to make a big
impact on your life. In writing from this perspective, you will want a clear introduction
that establishes the story you plan on telling, strong transitions and paragraphs
(probably chronologically organized) that put that overall story together, and a
conclusion that goes beyond simple summary to address the large context of
what you’vejust written about. What ultimate impact did those early experiences have
on the reader/writer you are today?
If you focus more on particular texts or experiences of reading and writing and how
they have impacted your life, you would structure your essay in a more subject-bysubject fashion. Your introduction would establish that you are writing about significant
moments where literacy or particular texts impacted your life and give a sense of why
those moments or texts are important. Your body paragraphs would be organized
around each of those texts or moments, explaining what they were and narrating why
they mattered. In this structure, your conclusion would again go beyond simple
summary to put the discussion in a larger context. Have those particular moments or
texts changed the way you read or address writing now? How might those experiences
be similar to or different from those of other individuals?
Regardless of how you organize the paper, the final draft of your paper needs to be
typed, double spaced, and in 12 point font with one inch margins. Your name, the
instructor’s name, the course number, and date need to be in the upper left hand
corner of the first page. Your last name and the page number should appear in the
upper right hand corner of each page. In other words the full MLA format.
ENG 1102: Essay 1: Literacy Narrative
Assignment: Write a short essay about the impact of reading upon your life. A literacy essay explores one’s
growth as a reader. Don’t confuse “literacy” with “literature.” The goal is to come up with a thesis that states
how one specific text, or perhaps a series of them, or just the written word in general contributed to your
personal development.
What you’ll be graded upon:
15%
Introduction: You set a context for why it’s important to discuss the place of reading and writing in our
lives. How has your experience in these areas shaped your values? What can other people learn from the
story you have to tell? You may use a specific anecdote or episode from your life to illustrate your point.
15%
Thesis: You state in 1-2 sentences your main idea. The thesis is the culmination of your introduction.
30%
Organization. You have two options for organizing your essay, depending on the focus you take:
OPTION 1: If you are writing about your experience becoming literate (learning to read and write), you
will probably take a narrative approach, detailing your first experiences in school or your first memories
of books or the first time reading or writing seemed to make a big impact on your life. You will want
strong transition from paragraph to paragraph, and your paragraphs should be around six sentences in
length to be fully developed. Your organization will probably be chronological, moving from stage to
stage in your life.
OPTION 2: If you focus more on a specific text or a specific reading experience, you’ll structure your
essay in a more subject-by-subject fashion. Your introduction will establish that you are writing about
significant moments at which literacy or particular texts impacted your life and give a sense of why
those moments or texts are important. Your body paragraphs will be organized around each of those
texts or moments, explaining what they were and narrating why they mattered. You will still want strong
transitions and paragraphs of roughly six sentences.
10%
Conclusion: Regardless of which option you choose, you want a conclusion that avoids summarizing
what you’ve just said. You also don’t want to say, “In conclusion.…” Your aim in a conclusion is to
place the discussion in a larger context. For example, how might those experiences be similar to or
different from those of other individuals? How do you envision the role of reading in your life in the
future?
15%
Grammar and mechanics: Your paper avoids basic grammar mistakes, such as dropped apostrophes in
possessives, subject/verb disagreement, arbitrary tense switches, etc. The paper demonstrates a
commitment to proofreading by avoiding easy-to-catch typos and word mistakes (effect for affect, for
example).
15%
Presentation: Your paper meets the minimum length criteria of 750 words, is typed with a title and your
name on it. You follow your individual professor’s instructions for formatting (margins, placement of
the name, etc).
ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY
An annotated bibliography is a list of secondary source citations with a short overview of each essay’s main
argument. The educational goal is to 1) gather information necessary for your final research paper and 2) to
train yourself in finding other authors’ theses sentences so you can write your own.
For this assignment you should:
1. List at least six secondary sources in alphabetical order. These should include 3 books and 3 journal articles.
2. Include all information required by the MLA style for the citat …
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