STRAYER How To Write A Personal Statement For Graduate School?

  

I need 60pages to write about university or school in Asian .How to Write a Personal Statement for Graduate School
Personal Statement, also known as Statement of Purpose, Letter of
Intent, or even Autobiographical Statement, is among the most important
element in your application. Nonetheless, they’re all asking for the
same five pieces of information.
What you’d like to study or on which field you want to concentrate.

Why you choose to such field.
What background you have in the field.
Why you choose a particular school.
What you plan to do after you graduate.
These five points provide a comprehensive introduction of yourself to
the admission committee. With such information, the admission committee
will be able to determine whether you are seriously interested in and
accumulate sufficient experience in the field you chosen. The committee
also considers your fit to the school.
How to make your Statement of Purpose stand out?
Covering the above five points is far less than sufficient. To be
accepted, you should create your personal statement in a unique style.
Many applicants simply list the facts of their academic life, goals and
reasons to choose the school in order to respond to the right questions.

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To distinguish your statement of purpose, it is a good idea to start
with an idea or story related to your field that turns you on
intellectually. It’s an effective essay-opener, and it lets you write
about something besides yourself for a bit. There are other benefits as
well. The idea you choose to talk about, and your comments on it, often
tell an admissions committee more about you than your own
self-descriptions can.
Do’s
Demonstrate your considerable dedication to earn a master’s and even a
doctorate degree.
Clearly state your reasons to choose a particular school. Have
someone else proofread your essay.
Don’tsBring up topics or
something of no interest to a prospective admissions committee. Excessive words on your
extracurricular activities. Reuse the same statement of
purpose for each school you apply to.
student_satisfaction_and_empowerment_through_complaining_in_insti_627_.pdf

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The University of San Francisco
USF Scholarship: a digital repository @ Gleeson Library |
Geschke Center
Doctoral Dissertations
Theses, Dissertations, Capstones and Projects
2008
Student satisfaction and empowerment through
complaining in institutions of higher learning
Farbod Karimi
Follow this and additional works at: https://repository.usfca.edu/diss
Part of the Education Commons
Recommended Citation
Karimi, Farbod, “Student satisfaction and empowerment through complaining in institutions of higher learning” (2008). Doctoral
Dissertations. 160.
https://repository.usfca.edu/diss/160
This Dissertation is brought to you for free and open access by the Theses, Dissertations, Capstones and Projects at USF Scholarship: a digital
repository @ Gleeson Library | Geschke Center. It has been accepted for inclusion in Doctoral Dissertations by an authorized administrator of USF
Scholarship: a digital repository @ Gleeson Library | Geschke Center. For more information, please contact repository@usfca.edu.
The University of San Francisco
STUDENT SATISFACTION AND EMPOWERMENT THROUGH COMPLAINING
IN INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING
A Dissertation Presented
to
The Faculty of the School of Education
International and Multicultural Education Department
In Partial Fulfillment
of the Requirements for the Degree
Doctor of Education
by
Farbod Karimi
San Francisco
December 2008
Copyright ©
Farbod Karimi
2008
ii
This dissertation, written under the direction of the candidate’s dissertation committee
and approved by the members of the committee, has been presented to and accepted by
the Faculty of the School of Education in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the
degree of Doctor of Education. The content and research methodologies presented in this
work represent the work of the candidate alone.
Farbod Karimi______________________________
Candidate
11/4/08 _________________
Date
Dissertation Committee
Dr. Susan Katz _____________________________
Chairperson
11/4/08 _________________
Dr. Rosita Galang ___________________________
Second Reader
10/21/08 ________________
Dr. Noah Borrero ___________________________
Third Reader
10/21/08 ________________
iii
Dedication
This dissertation is dedicated to the students who have given up
on institutions of higher learning
iv
Acknowledgments
After examining 240 dissertations and thesis acknowledgements, Hyland (2003)
determined that acknowledgements are not just “academic gift giving and selfpresentation” (p. 242). Instead, he found that acknowledgements are “intimations of the
shared ways of understanding experience, representing a window into the personal world
of student writers and the processes of engaging in the disciplines” (p. 261). In addition,
he discovered that acknowledgements reveal social and cultural characteristics within “a
broad generic structure” (p. 242). This researcher (me, that is) feels that the
acknowledgement section is the most difficult part of the dissertation to write. The
difficulty includes forgetting to mention someone, misspelling names, and worrying
about how people may react to my comments.
Okay, I am just going to get to the point. I have divided the acknowledgements
into three sections: USF Faculty & Staff, USF students, and Relatives & Friends. You
may read all of the acknowledgements or just go to the section that applies to you. If
your name is not mentioned, contact this researcher immediately.
USF Faculty & Staff
I would have to say that USF has been good to me principally by giving me the
opportunity to meet so many wonderful people. First of all, I would like to thank my
advisor, mentor, and friend, Dr. Susan Roberta Katz, not only for her help with my
dissertation but for introducing me to a world of truth and social justice, music, and
culture. Her community activism and dedication to human rights has given me hope for
v
change in the existing despotic system around the world. I would also thank Jake and
Issa for occasionally allowing me to take Dr. Katz away from them.
The first professor I met and studied with was Dr. Galang. Maraming salamat sa
supporta at tuinala mo sa akin. Hindi ko magawa ito kung wala ka. Salamat din sa pag
bigay mo sa parte ng committee. I KAW ANG PINA KA MAGALING. Thank you, Dr.
Borrero, for your very constructive feedback. It helped me to clarify some points in my
dissertation and to emphasize the uniqueness of my research. Dr. Baab, from the park to
the summer classes you have always been there for me. Thank you for your kind heart
and meticulous edits. Part of my sanity survived because of your active listening and
providing solutions. Dr. Fuentes, gracias por su reacción semanal de mis reflexiones.
Abrió mi mente y me ayudó mejor a entender la raza, la étnica, y la cultura. Dr. Koirala
Azad, mersi baraye hameh zahamat haye shoma va baray tashvige man dar classe shoma.
Janet Snyder, thank you for keeping the deans in line and for making sure that I got out of
USF in one piece. Barbara Hood, thank you for reminding me when my classes and QP
began. Joe Garity, thank you for listening to my complaints. The reference section of
this paper would be very short without your help. Judy, thank you for your smile and for
feeding me.
USF Students
I guess I will begin by thanking my biggest friend (literally), Aaron Horn (aka
ABM, CP, Helmet, MN). Even if had tried to give up on this endeavor, Aaron would not
let me. Thank you for Anaconda, crackers, sandwiches, Scribner&Cole, “forget about
it,” “Ahhhhh,” daily text messages, and being there for me, especially during
vi
Anthropology class. Aaron never gave up on me and he made sure that I stayed on track
“all da way.” I also had the honor of meeting Ms. Horn and Grandma Horn. Thank you
for your prayers and love. Now I can spend more time with you. Also let’s not forget
my brown sister Dr. Soma Sen. Thank you for keeping it brown.
Although Aaron and I were like a married couple around USF, I had the pleasure
of making several other friends who have helped me along this odyssey. Lisa, thank you
for introducing me to the right side of my brain. I enjoyed taking Teaching and Learning
Through the Arts with you. AraCHeli, thank you for your kindness and Spanglish.
Nabila (aka L. J.), thank you for giving me a hard time everyday. Samovar sends her
regards. Kimiyoshi, never forget Kreshan and SLA. Kayo, soccer is for boys. Conquer
Okinawa now. NANNNDEEHHHHHH. Yoko (aka OKI), “I STAAANNNDDD”
“LOOK AT DDDDAAATTT” “IT’S MOVING.” Don’t worry if your people attack I
will send my people to protect you. Mijan (SBS), thank you for eating all my food
during Stats class, and for taking care of the mouse in class. Onllywin, human rights
would not be right without you. Andrea, thank you for reminding me that “love” still
exists. Let’s not forget your specialty chicken.
Relatives and Friends
First of all I would like to thank my mother, Afarin Beglari, for single-handedly
raising my sister and me. She was the reason that I continued my education. I would
also like to thank my father, Cyrus Karimi, for being there for me and teaching me about
life. Mahin June aziz, mersi baraye mohebathaye shoma and kadohaye ziyad. Thanks to
Afsaneh, my emotional and lovable sister, her husband Kamran (aka Yahoodollah), and
vii
Ali, my baby brother, for always driving me crazy and promising to take care of me when
I get old. I would also like thank my other immediate family including Mohammad Ali
Karimi for taking me to DMV and taking care of me when I immigrated to the USA. He
always believed in me and was there for me. Maryam Eshraghi, thank you for taking
care of me like my mother. Nader, thank you for always giving me compliments and
being my PR, financial, and psychological consultant. Sefideh, khanom for telling me
that life is beautiful (yes, it is now), and Negar the wisest for being my role model and
taking great pictures. Ameh Jaan and Aghaye Karimi azizam. Mersi barayeh
zahamathaye shoma, mehmaniyeh ziyad, va fadkarihaye shoma barayeh khanevadeh.
Shahrzad va Shahram jaan, thank you for being my 24-hour relatives, doctors and
consultants. Eskandar (the other WB) and Gina (BG) for being the coolest, PHATEST,
OFFDAHOOK couzes. Shifteh and Dave aziz for the sessions and words of
encouragement. I would also like to take this opportunity to thank Mr. Hussien Gharai
for always calling me Doctor, Farideh jaan, Sahar (junior), Sudi, Maryam june (my
neighbor), Aghai Khan, and Lesley Brown (for putting up with Nader).
Payam (aka Alibaba, my best friend, cousin, ex-wife), khily hal mikoniyeh
martikeh. Thank you for forcing me to take a break and for Frys (cheese). Ginger (aka
CP, blts, FS) for her hard work and dedication for my future. Dr. Stephen and Mary
Goodwin, thank you for giving me the opportunity to lose my “V” and allowing me to be
part of the CS/D&CB family.
viii
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Dedication ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. iv
Acknowledgments………………………………………………………………………………………………….v
Abstract ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………… xi
List of Tables …………………………………………………………………………………………………….. xii
List of Figures …………………………………………………………………………………………………… xiii
CHAPTER I THE RESEARCH PROBLEM …………………………………………………………….1
Statement of the Problem……………………………………………………………………………..4
Purpose of the Study ……………………………………………………………………………………5
Research Questions……………………………………………………………………………………..5
Theoretical Rationale …………………………………………………………………………………..6
Significance of the Study ……………………………………………………………………………..9
Definitions of Terms ………………………………………………………………………………….10
Personal View on Complaining …………………………………………………………………..12
CHAPTER II LITERATURE REVIEW …………………………………………………………………17
Factors Affecting Students’ Sense of Satisfaction with Their Educational
Experiences ……………………………………………………………………………………17
Expressing Dissatisfaction ………………………………………………………………………….25
Complaining and Empowerment …………………………………………………………………31
Demographic Characteristics and Complaining …………………………………………….33
Summary ………………………………………………………………………………………………….37
CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY …………………………………………………………………………40
Restatement of the Purpose…………………………………………………………………………40
Research Design………………………………………………………………………………………..40
Research Setting………………………………………………………………………………………..41
Research Participants …………………………………………………………………………………42
Data Collection …………………………………………………………………………………………43
Interview Questions …………………………………………………………………………………..44
Data Analysis ……………………………………………………………………………………………47
Researcher’s Background …………………………………………………………………………..47
Protection of Human Subjects …………………………………………………………………….48
Reliability and Validity………………………………………………………………………………48
CHAPTER IV RESULTS……………………………………………………………………………………..49
Participant Profiles…………………………………………………………………………………….49
Participant Demographics…………………………………………………………………………..55
ix
Responses to Research Questions………………………………………………………………..59
Summary of Findings…………………………………………………………………………………97
CHAPTER V DISCUSSION, RECOMMENDATIONS, AND CONCLUSION………….99
Discussion ………………………………………………………………………………………………..99
Recommendations for Practice ………………………………………………………………….113
Recommendations for Further Research……………………………………………………..116
Conclusion ……………………………………………………………………………………………..116
Researcher’s Reflections…………………………………………………………………………..117
REFERENCES ………………………………………………………………………………………………….121
APPENDIXES …………………………………………………………………………………………………..129
Appendix A: IRBHS Permission and Documentation…………………………………130
Appendix B: [Halo] College Dress Code, Attendance, and Brush-Up
Policies………………………………………………………………………..135
Appendix C: Examples of Student Violence as a Response to
Dissatisfaction………………………………………………………………138
Appendix D: [Halo] College Recruitment Flyers……………………………………….143
Appendix E: Examples of Students’ Stories ……………………………………………..145
x
Abstract
Student satisfaction and commitment to an educational program are important
factors in determining student success. Although research on the subject of satisfaction
has primarily been conducted in the context of business, particularly with regard to
customer complaints and complaint management strategies, institutions of higher learning
(IHLs) are beginning to adopt business models to increase student satisfaction and
retention. Due to the pervasive perception of complaining as being negative, insufficient
data exist to determine whether the act of complaining has an impact on students’ sense
of satisfaction and empowerment with their educational experience. Through one-on-one
interviews with 20 students at an urban career college, this qualitative study explores
students’ sense of empowerment, satisfaction, and complaint behavior through the lens of
students’ experiences. The results of this study indicate that the act of complaining can
be an important tool for students in addressing dissatisfaction with their educational
experiences. “Honest” complaining was found to be especially effective, a term
developed in this study to describe complaints wherein the students sincerely believed
themselves to be in the right. Further, the participants in this study unanimously
indicated that when their “honest” complaints were genuinely heard, they felt more
satisfied and empowered by the experience of complaining, whether or not they received
their desired outcome. These findings suggest that some IHLs should consider
establishing systems to encourage and address “honest” complaining as part of their
overall strategy to elicit feedback, increase retention, and promote positive word-ofmouth.
xi
LIST OF TABLES
Tables
Table 1.
Participants’ Demographic Information ……………………………………………..57
Table 2.
Barriers to the Pursuit of Personal Goals with Examples from Participants’
Experiences ………………………………………………………………………………….108
xii
LIST OF FIGURES
Figures
Figure 1: Breakdown of participant ethnicities shown as percent of total
participants…………………………………………………………………………………..58
Figure 2: Breakdown of participants’ declared academic majors shown as
percent of total participants…………………………………………………………….58
Figure 3: Outcomes of student dissatisfaction as described by the study
participants…………………………………………………………………………………..75
Figure 4: Examples of areas upon which students may build trust, positive
outcomes of establishing trust, and potential negative outcomes of
loss of trust…………………………………………………………………………………101
xiii
Student Satisfaction and Empowerment 1
CHAPTER I
THE RESEARCH PROBLEM
One thing I’ve been telling a lot of people, is that the best thing I’ve learned from
this school is patience. (Nilda)
Students in the United States currently have many choices for attending
institutions of higher learning (IHLs), such as four-year universities, community colleges,
vocational institutions, and face-to-face or online learning environments. Although these
institutions vary widely with regard to campus culture, curriculum, and other factors,
their students often share the same disconnect between initial expectations and actual
college experiences (Schroeder, 2001). For example, students frequently browse college
catalogs to help with their enrollment decisions; however, after enrolling they may be
disappointed to learn that some courses may not be offered for years at a time. When
students’ experiences do not reflect their expectations, the level of their satisfaction
decreases (Kowalski, 1996).
Student satisfaction and commitment to an educational program are important
factors in determining student success (Bennett, 2003). Focusing on student satisfaction
allows institutions of higher learning (IHLs) to monitor continuously how effectively
they are meeting student expectations (Elliot, 2002). Although many factors influence
students’ satisfaction with their educational experiences, few IHLs have developed
proactive strategies to discover the root causes of student dissatisfaction. With the
growing belief that higher education has entered a new environment in which quality
plays an increasingly important role (Koch, 2003; Owlia & Aspinwall, 1996; Sahney,
Banwet, & Karunes, 2004), awareness of sources of student dissatisfaction and how
Student Satisfaction and Empowerment 2
students express their concerns has grown as well (Guolla, 1999; Seeman & O’Hara,
2006; Su & Bao, 2001).
Research on the subject of satisfaction has primarily been conducted in the
context of business, particularly with regard to customer complaints and complaint
management strategies (Bodey & Grace, 2006; Bolfing, 1989; Goodwin, 1990; Nyer,
2000; Plymire, 1991; Seeman & O’Hara, 2006). Studies show that consumers who were
encouraged to complain reported greater increases in satisfaction and product evaluation
compared to consumers who were not explicitly invited to complain (Blodgett,
Wakefield, & Barnes, 1995; Bolfing, 1989; Chen-Yu & H …
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